Geranium

I love gardens with lots of flowering perennials – they’re so much more substantial than bedding plants. Not only do they provide plenty of colour, height and movement, but they’re relatively fuss free and easy to care for too. One of the best things about perennials is that they stay in your garden and flower every year, each year forming a bigger, more established clump.

At the end of the flowering season, chop perennials right back to 1-2 inches. They’ll then become dormant for winter and then regrow the following spring.

Here are some easy sun-loving perennials which are flowering now in my garden:

Verbascum

Verbascum

Verbascum

Verbascum like hot, sunny borders and cope well with drought. Some varieties grow very tall and are perfect for the back of the border. This one (‘Southern Charm’) is shorter, growing to under 1m, but it is quite bendy and usually requires staking.

Hardy geranium

Geranium

Geranium

Hardy geraniums are great because they’re flower from June right the way though summer. They require very little maintenance – just cut them right back if they start to look tatty and they will grow back and flower all over again. They don’t really need watering and can grow in very poor soil, in sun or partial shade. In my opinion, these are the best summer-flowering perennials for beginners. I think this one is Geranium ‘Johnsons Blue’.

Astrantia

Astrantia

Astrantia

Astrantias are low maintenance and look great in the border, plus they also make great cut flowers too. They come in various shades of pink, mauve, white and burgundy.

Sisyrinchium

Sisirynchium

Sisirynchium

Sisyrinchium grow well in sunny borders with very little fuss, and they’re ideal if you don’t want to spend lots of time watering. The leaves are in a similar ‘fan’ shape to irises and multiple, small creamy yellow flowers are produced up the stem. Growing to about knee height, they look great planted in clumps near the front of the border.

Nepeta

Nepeta

Nepeta

Nepeta is also known as catmint. Bees and butterflies love it, and it has a soft, wild look to it, making it ideal for wildlife and cottage-style gardens. The leaves have a sweet, minty smell.

If you’re a busy person and want colour in your garden but don’t have time for faffing around, give these a go. They’re quite bog standard, but they’re very reliable and don’t ask for much care.

Do you like flowers which attract bees, butterflies and other wildlife? Read my other blog post, Plants for pollinators.

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About garden nomey

I studied Horticulture at Writtle College in Essex back in the early noughties – it was good fun and a great place to learn, and since then I’ve had various lovely jobs. I started working as a gardener at Trinity College in Cambridge, which is the biggest of Cambridge University’s colleges. That was the best gardening job I’ve ever had, the gardeners were talented and knowledgable (and fun!), the college was relaxed and the grounds are extensive and beautiful. There are amazing gardens locked behind ‘secret garden’ doorways in ancient walls, huge perennial borders to tend to, massive hedges to trim (one is 30ft high) and lawns to mow with precision. It was the perfect place for me, as a new gardener, to gain all the experience I might need to see me off into a career in horticulture. I went on to do various other gardening jobs for a few more years, before deciding that I would like to write about plants. Just as I was wondering how on earth I might get into this (as I was only trained in horticulture), I stumbled upon a Marketing Assistant job with an online and catalogue plant supplier, and they kindly took me in. This was my dream job at the time and I felt so lucky, I spent every day writing plant copy and gaining experience and knowledge in marketing and website management – something I’d never even thought about doing in the past. As it turned out, I loved it! Since then I’ve worked for more online plant suppliers, plus magazines including Which? Gardening Magazine and BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine. I currently work as a garden writer for Hubert Burda Media UK and fill some of my spare time with freelance copy writing and blogging work. Every single one of my jobs has taught me so much and I think I’ve found my niche – I’m a Gardener, Copy Writer, Garden Marketer, Feature Writer and Online Content Manager! I’ve been involved in this industry for a good while now. I’ve been to a lot of press shows, I work and have worked with a lot of suppliers and I constantly see people I know in magazines and at gardening events. I really feel like I’m part of this lovely, friendly industry and that makes me very happy. I hope you enjoy my blog! Naomi
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